17 years after 9/11, Afghanistan remains the war

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Sarah Zaman in “View 360” covered these topics:

Americans on Tuesday will mark the 17th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks that claimed almost 3,000 lives.President Donald Trump will attend a ceremony at the 9/11 memorial in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, near where United Airlines Flight 93 crashed after passengers retook control from the al-Qaida affiliated terrorists who had hijacked the plane.

Over the next few months, as happens each year, thousands of 17-year-olds with parental consent will sign papers to join the armed services and head off for boot camp when they turn 18. Except there’s a difference this time. These young people will enter a military that has been at war — in Afghanistan — longer than they have been alive.

The Afghanistan War started a month after the 9/11 terror attacks, which killed nearly 3,000 Americans 17 years ago Tuesday. The United States launched an assault on the Taliban regime that offered haven to Osama bin Laden and his al-Qaeda plotters. The Taliban were driven from power in several weeks. But the war has never stopped and continues to be waged in the margins of American consciousness.

The Trump administration on Monday (10 September) threatened tough action against the International Criminal Court should it try to prosecute Americans for alleged war crimes in Afghanistan and said the PLO’s office in Washington would be closed for seeking to punish Israel through the court.

“The United States will use any means necessary to protect our citizens and those of our allies from unjust prosecution by this illegitimate court,” national security adviser John Bolton told the Federalist Society, a conservative group, in his first major address since joining President Donald Trump’s White House in April.